June 23, 2014
Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico. April 2014. 
Photo by Jonathan P Thompson/gin+gelato

Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico. April 2014. 

Photo by Jonathan P Thompson/gin+gelato

February 11, 2014
Rich Perino’s truck. Silverton, Colo., circa 1996. 
Photo by Jonathan Thompson/gin+gelato

Rich Perino’s truck. Silverton, Colo., circa 1996. 

Photo by Jonathan Thompson/gin+gelato

February 7, 2014
Friday Flashback 2: Snow train. Silverton, Colo., circa 2004. 
Photo by Jonathan Thompson/gin+gelato

Friday Flashback 2: Snow train. Silverton, Colo., circa 2004. 

Photo by Jonathan Thompson/gin+gelato

February 7, 2014
Friday Flashback: Silverton, Colo., after a snow storm, circa 2005. 
Photo by Jonathan Thompson/gin+gelato

Friday Flashback: Silverton, Colo., after a snow storm, circa 2005. 

Photo by Jonathan Thompson/gin+gelato

December 18, 2013
Restaurant entrance. Rome, February 2011. 
Photo by Jonathan P Thompson/gin+gelato

Restaurant entrance. Rome, February 2011. 

Photo by Jonathan P Thompson/gin+gelato

December 16, 2013
Berlin from the top of a partially destroyed and buried WWII bunker at Humboldthain. December 2010. 
Photo by Jonathan P Thompson/gin+gelato

Berlin from the top of a partially destroyed and buried WWII bunker at Humboldthain. December 2010. 

Photo by Jonathan P Thompson/gin+gelato

November 18, 2013
I was driving the first time I saw the Golden Gate Bridge, and so befuddled was I by the sight that I almost swerved off the road. I had grown up amid spectacular mountains and canyons, but had never seen anything human-made on that scale. It simply didn’t seem possible. My friend and I, both 19, screamed with awe, fascination and a little bit of terror.

A quarter of a century has passed, and my reaction to larger-than-life infrastructure hasn’t dulled. I’m the dumb hick who gawks up at the skyscrapers in a city, and who cringes in fear as he drives down the casino canyon of the Las Vegas Strip. But to me perhaps nothing is as awesome to behold as Glen Canyon Dam. Like the Golden Gate Bridge, the dam is a spectacle, dwarfing much of the natural world all around. I can stand for hours on the vertigo-inducing bridge that spans the cold, green Colorado just downstream – a 1,000-foot long steel spiderweb suspended gracefully over a 700-foot deep void – simply trying to comprehend Glen Canyon Dam’s concrete enormity: 300 feet thick at its base, 1,500 feet long at the crest. More than that, though, is what it represents: Our effort to control what was once a muddy, wild, tumultuous river, to rein it in with a colossal concrete plug, holding back billions of gallons of water and flooding hundreds of miles of once-sublime canyons.
Read the rest of the essay: Drought, Glen Canyon Dam, climate change and God. 
Photo: gin+gelato/Jonathan Thompson

I was driving the first time I saw the Golden Gate Bridge, and so befuddled was I by the sight that I almost swerved off the road. I had grown up amid spectacular mountains and canyons, but had never seen anything human-made on that scale. It simply didn’t seem possible. My friend and I, both 19, screamed with awe, fascination and a little bit of terror.

A quarter of a century has passed, and my reaction to larger-than-life infrastructure hasn’t dulled. I’m the dumb hick who gawks up at the skyscrapers in a city, and who cringes in fear as he drives down the casino canyon of the Las Vegas Strip. But to me perhaps nothing is as awesome to behold as Glen Canyon Dam. Like the Golden Gate Bridge, the dam is a spectacle, dwarfing much of the natural world all around. I can stand for hours on the vertigo-inducing bridge that spans the cold, green Colorado just downstream  a 1,000-foot long steel spiderweb suspended gracefully over a 700-foot deep void  simply trying to comprehend Glen Canyon Dam’s concrete enormity: 300 feet thick at its base, 1,500 feet long at the crest. More than that, though, is what it represents: Our effort to control what was once a muddy, wild, tumultuous river, to rein it in with a colossal concrete plug, holding back billions of gallons of water and flooding hundreds of miles of once-sublime canyons.

Read the rest of the essay: Drought, Glen Canyon Dam, climate change and God. 

Photo: gin+gelato/Jonathan Thompson

September 27, 2013
Fog. Route 66. Gallup, NM. 
Photo: gin+gelato/Jonathan Thompson

Fog. Route 66. Gallup, NM.

Photo: gin+gelato/Jonathan Thompson

(Source: ginandgelato)

September 24, 2013
Tree and parking lot. Gallup, NM. 
Photo: gin+gelato/Jonathan Thompson

Tree and parking lot. Gallup, NM.

Photo: gin+gelato/Jonathan Thompson

September 24, 2013
Hotel and puddles in the empty parking lot. Gallup, NM. 
Photo: gin+gelato/Jonathan Thompson

Hotel and puddles in the empty parking lot. Gallup, NM.

Photo: gin+gelato/Jonathan Thompson

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